Educate Me | The value of education

Educate Me | The value of education

Educate Me is an Egyptian NGO that aspires to redefine education in Egypt. We started in 2010 as a fundraising initiative to reinstate financially underprivileged children back to school, shortly after we discovered that sending children to schools DOES NOT guarantee their education, most students attending Egyptian public schools end up graduating functionally illiterate or robbed of basic 21st century skills and therefore unable to cope with current and future life challenges.

Recyclobekia | Expanding the scope

Recyclobekia | Expanding the scope

Recyclobekia started in 2011 with 20 college students having a dream of building their own business - one that could change their lives and their dear country. Due to their engineering background, they seized an opportunity in the recycling business of electronic waste. Although you donā€™t see the damage e-waste can do the environment, it is actually the 2nd most dangerous waste after nuclear. We found that his was an untapped area and someone has to do something to keep the danger out and the benefits in.

The UN's SDGs, entrepreneurship & development in Egypt

The UN's SDGs, entrepreneurship & development in Egypt

In August, RISE Egypt turned 2 years old. Birthdays are a wonderful time to reflect, and over the past few months, we have been reflecting deeply on where we are and where we are headed. Members of the staff, the board of directors, the RISE fellows, and our global network have all contributed invaluable insights as we stop to assess where we are now, compare it to where we hoped to be, and renew our energy to power on toward the future.

Jozour | From palm midribs to a good life

Jozour | From palm midribs to a good life

Turning palm midribs to wood

The way to turn a village from point of migration to a destination

The space is tight and overcrowded with the high numbers of rush hour commuters. Sameh is no longer able to control himself; he appears hysterical as he begins to shove everyone around him with all the force he could muster. He struggles to reach the nearest window, or perhaps he can make it to the door first. In places like this, Sameh cannot breathe; his allergies get the best of him. At last, he reaches the window and, as he draws a deep breath, he blames himself for deciding to hop on to this train. Perhaps, he thinks, he should have waited even longer, may be a less crowded one might have finally come along.